Spinning in Front of Inca Walls

Spinning in Front of Inca Walls

Nilda spins as she walks beside the ruins along the top of the hill above her house. She and other Andean people often pass the remains of their ancestors’ temples, forts, palaces, staircases, terraces, waterworks, and stone-lined roadways.

This is especially true in Chinchero which was once the country estate of one of the last emperors, Tupa Inca. Palace walls were constructed of large stones put together like giant jigsaw puzzles. Inside, the palace would probably have been light and bright, despite the small trapezoidal windows in the heavy stone walls. In royal palaces inhabited by “The Son of the Sun,” bright rays were intended to reflect off of gold and silver wall ornaments and shine on sculptures and fine weavings.

Inca people who live in the Andes walk for miles and while they walk they spin yarn for weaving.